Code for America, Connecting city and Web 2.0 talent

L’Open data de la citée a déjà commencé dans certaines grandes villes des USA, comme NY, DC, SF. En 2010, il va connaître un tournant majeur, avec Code for America.
 
CodeforamericaLes données concernant l’environnement, le transport, la sécurité, l’habitat, …peuvent être reprises par des milliers de développeurs de part le monde, qui innovent et présentent au citoyen les informations de sa ville ou de sa région, information fournie sur tout type de support moderne : vocal, mobile, web etc… Ainsi sans se déplacer ou frapper à la porte d’une administration quelconque, le citoyen retrouvera toutes les informations de la citée dont il aura besoin.

Code for America, qui agit sous le sponsoring de Sunlight Foundation, Washington DC, propose un programme clair.

2010
January
Orientation/CFA Institute: The selected recruits come together at the headquarters for a month of training, team building, working on internal tools, and project research.  A key element of this portion of the program is the guest speaker series; leaders in both government and the web industry provide inspiration and build the recruits’ networks.  The corps is divided into teams of five, each team assigned to a host city and that city’s project.
February
City Tour: Next, the corps visit their host cities for one month.  Their job is to learn how city government works, build a network of contacts in City Hall, and identify where CFA can have the most impact.  The city sponsor serves as host, orienting the corps, setting up meetings for them with a broad array of stakeholders and answering questions.  The goal is to be able to represent the needs of their host city when they return for the development phase.
March – September
Development: Each team then has seven months to develop their application for their city.  Teams work together at headquarters, sharing resources where appropriate.  Ongoing training and guest speaker series continue through this phase.
September
Launch and Launch Conference:  At month nine of the cycle, teams launch their applications.  Staff from all the host cities come to headquarters for a launch conference, where each team demos their project for all the cities to see.  This is an opportunity for the cities to strengthen their relationships with each other and discuss common priorities, including common technology needs and open data standards.
October – November
Maintenance and hand-off: In the final months, the CFAers document their work, fix bugs and add final features, and work with the city to transition maintenance of the application.2010
Recruitment: Both cities and corps recruits go through a competitive application process.  For the 2011 cycle, we are targeting five cities and 25 recruits.  Cities identify a project that fits the CFA criteria, including a clear business case, and demonstrate they have support for the program among their internal stakeholders.  Recruits must show a successful Web 2.0 application they’ve built (or significantly contributed to) and demonstrate talent and professionalism.
2011
January
Orientation/CFA Institute: The selected recruits come together at the headquarters for a month of training, team building, working on internal tools, and project research.  A key element of this portion of the program is the guest speaker series; leaders in both government and the web industry provide inspiration and build the recruits’ networks.  The corps is divided into teams of five, each team assigned to a host city and that city’s project.
February
City Tour: Next, the corps visit their host cities for one month.  Their job is to learn how city government works, build a network of contacts in City Hall, and identify where CFA can have the most impact.  The city sponsor serves as host, orienting the corps, setting up meetings for them with a broad array of stakeholders and answering questions.  The goal is to be able to represent the needs of their host city when they return for the development phase.
March – September
Development: Each team then has seven months to develop their application for their city.  Teams work together at headquarters, sharing resources where approp
riate.  Ongoing training and guest speaker series continue through this phase.
September
Launch and Launch Conference:  At month nine of the cycle, teams launch their applications.  Staff from all the host cities come to headquarters for a launch conference, where each team demos their project for all the cities to see.  This is an opportunity for the cities to strengthen their relationships with each other and discuss common priorities, including common technology needs and open data standards.
October – November
Maintenance and hand-off: In the final months, the CFAers document their work, fix bugs and add final features, and work with the city to transition maintenance of the application.

2010: Recruitment

Both cities and fellows go through a competitive application process. (Cities can apply now; fellows later.)  For the 2011 cycle, we are targeting five cities and 25 fellows.  Cities identify a project that fits the CFA criteria, including a clear business case, and demonstrate they have support for the program among their internal stakeholders.  Fellows must show a successful Web 2.0 application they’ve built (or significantly contributed to) and demonstrate talent and professionalism.

2011: Program Begins

January
Orientation/CFA Institute: The selected fellows come together at the headquarters for a month of training, team building, working on internal tools, and project research.  A key element of this portion of the program is the guest speaker series; leaders in both government and the web industry provide inspiration and build the corps’ networks. The fellows are divided into teams of five, each team assigned to a host city and that city’s project.

February
City Tour: Next, the fellows visit their host cities for one month.  Their job is to learn how city government works, build a network of contacts in City Hall, and identify where CFA can have the most impact.  The city sponsor serves as host, orienting the fellows, setting up meetings for them with a broad array of stakeholders and answering questions.  The goal is to be able to represent the needs of their host city when they return for the development phase.

March – September
Development: Each team then has seven months to develop their application for their city.  Teams work together at headquarters, sharing resources where appropriate.  Ongoing training and guest speaker series continue through this phase.

September
Launch and Launch Conference:  At month nine of the cycle, teams launch their applications.  Staff from all the host cities come to headquarters for a launch conference, where each team demos their project for all the cities to see.  This is an opportunity for the cities to strengthen their relationships with each other and discuss common priorities, including common technology needs and open data standards.

October – November
Maintenance and hand-off: In the final months, the fellows document their work, fix bugs and add final features, and work with the city to transition maintenance of the application.

Iti_parisA San Francisco,  BART a permit à M.Murcy de développer Transit Bay; En France, M.Murcy a développé une application sur mobile concernant la disponibilité des vélos et des emplacements pour un itinéraire donné dans Paris.


 

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